SELECT DISTINCTROW FAMILIES.Family, FAMILIES.FamCode, FAMILIES.CommonName FROM ((COUNTFAO RIGHT JOIN SPECIES ON COUNTFAO.SpecCode = SPECIES.SpecCode) RIGHT JOIN FAMILIES ON SPECIES.FamCode = FAMILIES.FamCode) WHERE (((FAMILIES.SYNONYM) Is Null Or (FAMILIES.SYNONYM)=0) AND ((FAMILIES.Ordnum)=46) ) ORDER BY FAMILIES.SYNONYM DESC , FAMILIES.Family Fish Identification: Find family
Fish Identification: Find Family
Glossary 1 families of toadfishes FishBase

Batrachoididae Batrachoididae - (Toadfishes) Toadfishes are known to occur in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific oceans. Chiefly marine: coastal and benthic; rarely in brackish waters. Few freshwater species. 3 subfamilies: Batrachoidinae with 15 genera and about 43 species distributed off coasts of the Americas, Africa, Europe, southern Aisa, and Australia; Porichthyinae with 2 genera, 15 species and Thalassophryninae with 2 genera, 11 species, distributed in the Eastern Pacific and western Atlantic. Bottom dwellers feeding on invertebrates and fishes. Small to medium-sized fishes (to 57 cm) easily recognized by their characteristic shape. Head broad and flattened, often with barbels and/or fleshy flaps; eyes on top of head, dorsally-directed; mouth wide. Gill openings restricted to sides, just in front of pectoral fin base. Two dorsal fins, the first consisting of 2 or 3 strong, sharp spines; the second consisting of a large number of soft rays; pelvic fins jugular, inserted well in advance of pectoral fins, with 1 spine and 2 or 3 soft rays. One to several lateral lines on head and body. Body naked or covered with small, cycloid scales. Color: mostly drab brown with spots or saddles of black, although at least one coral reef species, Sanopus splendidus, is brightly coloured. One subfamily, the Porichthyinae, is characterized by having photophores (light-emitting organs) in rows along lateral lines on head and body. Toadfishes are bottom-dwellers ranging from shallow inshore areas to deep waters; several species enter rivers, and some migrate regularly between shallow and deep waters. They are rather sluggish in their movements and are ambush predators, feeding mainly on molluscs and crustaceans. They may bite when handled. The subfamily Thalassophryninae, or "venomous toadfishes", includes species with hollow spines in the first dorsal fin and on the opercles; the spines are connected to venom glands that can force a poison into a wound. Although no catch statistics are reported, larger species of toadfishes are commonly found in local markets. Some species are eaten and may fetch fairly high prices in Venezuela and French Guiana. The family is divided into three subfamilies (Collette, 1966): Batrachoidinae (about 18 genera, 47 species), Porichthyinae (2 genera, 15 species), and Thalassophryninae (2 genera, 11 species). The more generalized Batrachoidinae is world wide in distribution and contains a few freshwater species, one in Central America and one in South America. The more specialized midshipmen (Porichthyinae) and venomous toadfishes (Thalassophryninae) are restricted to the New World. All Porichthyinae are marine but there are three freshwater species of Thalassophryninae in South America. Genera 25 Species 78 (Ref. 86865).


Note: Families with unknown counts of dorsal or anal spines are also included

php script by kbanasihan, 05.20.10 ,  last modified by mortiz 29.06.12